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Take Action

Wondering how you can get more involved in efforts to safeguard nature, communities and the climate through law?

Check out this page for information and opportunities to take action by attending events, contacting decision-makers, participating in government processes and more.


As Canada’s Parliament returns to session this fall, we must make sure that a green and just recovery is the government’s top priority. We don’t have a moment to lose – big polluters have been busy lobbying for bailouts and exemptions from environmental rules. 

The federal government is preparing to give the Canadian economy a multi-billion-dollar kick-start in an effort to recover from the COVID-19 health crisis. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to invest in a Green Recovery – a sustainable stimulus package focused on increasing employment and helping Canada transition to a cleaner and more equitable economy.

This summer, we’ve been thinking a lot about the people across BC – and throughout the country – who support West Coast in the work that we do.

How can Canada meet its greenhouse gas reduction targets and break its cycle of failing grades? Implement a Canadian Climate Accountability Act.

After COVID-19, let's build BC back better – in ways that fight climate change, inequality & injustice. 

We are facing a climate emergency and a biodiversity crisis. Canadians are already experiencing floods, fires, ecological disruption and as our planet continues to warm, our collective well-being is deeply under threat.

There is still time to chart a course to a safe future for all – but we won’t be able to stop this crisis without federal investments in climate action and nature conservation and biodiversity protection.

In June 2019, Canadians celebrated the passing of a series of important federal environmental laws – including the Impact Assessment Act and Canadian Energy Regulator Act (Bill C-69) and the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act (Bill C-48). Bills C-69 and C-48 overhauled Canada’s broken environmental assessment process, strengthened energy regulation, and banned crude oil supertankers on the Pacific north coast.

It was called “Canada’s climate election,” and as the dust settles we can celebrate that 63% of votes cast were in favour of parties that made strong climate promises.

However, Canada has an unfortunate history of making strong climate promises, setting ambitious targets and then not delivering. We need strong laws that make sure that this cannot be allowed to happen again.