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So why does West Coast Environmental Law need a blog?

17 December, 2009

Well everyone else had one, and we just felt left out…

Seriously, though: here are the top 5 reasons why West Coast has launched the Environmental Law Alert blog (or blawg).ELABlog.jpg

  1. We need a way to alert the public about concerns and problems with BC’s environmental laws. West Coast has always been BC's watchdog for the environment, warning of legal changes that will weaken environmental protection or of laws that are not strong enough to begin with. But when we’ve relied on the media to report on our barking it often hasn’t worked. While changes to the law can have huge impacts on the ground, they are often complex and mysterious, and don’t make a great media story. West Coast needs to be able to warn the public (as well as interested journalists, government officials and other readers) directly and quickly.
  2. We have a lot of great stories. Stories are what make a movement, and West Coast Environmental Law has some of the best. Our work with grassroots community groups and individual British Columbians struggling to protect their environment involve drama and conflict, victory and defeat, and these stories should be shared more broadly.
  3. British Columbians need a forum to discuss environmental law and policy. You can comment on our posts. You can share your perspectives with your networks and decision-makers. Promoting discussion about environmental law and how the law can better protect our environment is what West Coast is about.
  4. We need a way to hear what people have to say. As lawyers it can be tempting to think that we’re the experts. West Coast has always rejected that view. We are here to work with all British Columbians who want to protect their environment. As such, we need to hear about your perspectives on the environmental law issues that we’re working on. So please leave comments and let us know what you think.
  5. Reach out to more British Columbians. Social media allows us to be heard by more British Columbians, which generates momentum and builds communities of support, allowing West Coast to help more people and to be more effective in protecting the environment.

That’s my top 5 list. Do you have any other suggestions about what West Coast should be trying to accomplish through this blog? What are you looking for in a BC-focused environmental law blog, and how can we make it useful for you?