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CEAA

The fast and the furious - Coming changes to environmental laws speed up process for industry and are an accident waiting to happen for the public and our environment

31 January, 2012

The federal government seems set on further gutting theCanadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA), and is expected to introduce “sweeping” regulatory changes to CEAA and related legislation in the House of Commons in the coming weeks. These changes could affect upcoming proposals for pipelines, tar sands projects, mines, small and large energy generation, and much more. It is possiblethe government could also use this opportunity to affect the process for projects currently in the environmental review process, like the Enbridge oil pipeline and supertanker, New Prosperity, or Site C Clean Energy Project proposals.

 

Our ‘radical’ perspective: environmental assessment that respects the environment, the public, First Nations and the economy

10 January, 2012

Recently the federal Ministers of the Environment and of Natural Resources have publicly confirmed that major changes may be in the works for federal environmental assessment (EA). And by all indications Canadians should be worried. Based on statements made in an open letter released January 9th, federal Natural Resources Minister Oliver appears to view the democratic right of citizens to be heard and the constitutional right of First Nations to be honourably consulted about, for example, large inter-provincial oil pipeline and tanker terminal projects as merely ‘exploiting loopholes’ in and ‘hijacking’ the regulatory process (which is designed to allow citizen participation) to achieve ‘radical’ agendas.

 

Recently the federal Ministers of the Environment and of Natural Resources have publicly confirmed that major changes may be in the works for federal environmental assessment (EA). And by all indications Canadians should be worried.

Lessons from the gulf: Environmental Assessment

10 May, 2010

As I posted previously, the biggest take-away message for Canada and BC from the BP oilspill in the Gulf of Mexico is that oil and gas development at sea is so inherently risky that even strong environmental laws regulating the activity cannot remove the risks of a catastrophic oil spill.  In an isolated, pristine ecosystem the best environmental law would be a ban on any drilling or transportation of oil. 

Protest against gutting CEAA turns to Facebook

26 April, 2010

Your take-away message: If you do anything after reading this post – join the Facebook group Save Canada’s Environmental Laws!, and get your friends to do the same. 

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